Monthly Archives: July 2013

*Jessica Ennis-Hill probably looked more nervous on the start-line for the 100m hurdles yesterday afternoon than she did for the start of the Olympic heptathlon last year and such apprehension was understandable as the London Anniversary Games was the acid test to see whether her nagging Achilles tendon would stand up to the strains of top-class competition. Ennis-Hill was never going to replicate her UK record form in her first hurdles race since the Olympic heptathlon twelve months ago but a 13.08 debut off the back of very little hurdles work and negligible speed work marked a sound opener and it was promising she came away unscathed after six physically taxing efforts in deteriorating conditions in the long jump.

*The most important result will be the outcome of how the Achilles tendon responds post-competition and if it reacts well, Ennis-Hill will be a contender to regain the title she first won in 2009 despite a far from ideal build-up. To put her performances into context, she was fourth in the 100m hurdles in 13.08 and only 0.13 behind 12.47 performer and Olympic bronze medallist Kellie Wells and her time was more importantly 0.24 faster than Tatyana Chernova’s hurdles PB. Her midweek javelin PB of 48.33m is also in excess of what her Russian rival has achieved this year too. Granted, a two-day heptathlon demands much more on the body and the nature of the injury might make her somewhat fallible in the high jump but let’s hope she does make the trip to Moscow as fit as she can be as the championships are already missing more than a few world stars.

*If Ennis-Hill misses the World Championships, Perri Shakes-Drayton and Christine Ohuruogu will carry the hopes of the British women next month based on the form they showed in the Olympic Stadium. Shakes-Drayton, who has been a perennial top-three fixture on the Diamond League circuit this year, took another runner-up finish to Zuzana Hejnova from Czech Republic in the 400m hurdles on Friday night and even though she lost her rhythm over the final flight of barriers after an unusually aggressive first 300m which left the door open for Hejnova to win her eighth race of the season, Shakes-Drayton was still rewarded with a PB of 53.67. A slight change in pacing for Moscow could see her rewarded with her first global outdoor medal and a time close to 53-seconds.

*Ohuruogu has been flirting with new tactics in the 400m this year and the 2008 Olympic champion struck the perfect balance between starting purposefully yet keeping enough back to attack in the home-straight. She was rewarded with her fastest ever non-championships time of 50.00 which is an ominous warning for her rivals as Ohuruogu always changes up a gear for the major championships. Amantle Montsho will be her main threat despite a defeat to Ohuruogu in Birmingham although Antonina Krivoshapka, who Ohuruogu will probably like on her outside in the world final given her propensity to blaze away, won’t get many better chances at claiming an elusive global title.

Solid return to big-time for Ennis-Hill but not sure about Worlds

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Are the Russians cleaning up their act?

Are the Russians cleaning up their act?

Tyson Gay and Asafa Powell’s positive drug tests marked an arguable nadir for the sport’s reputation in recent years but while lacking the sporting currency to make an impact on the back-pages, the Russian track and field team has been a perennial fixture at the forefront of doping controversies over the past decade.

Jenny Meadows and Lynsey Sharp have been outspoken critics of Russian athletics after being denied major 800m accolades by subsequently-busted Russians while UK javelin record-holder Goldie Sayers was the latest name to publicly question whether the country is fit to host the World Championships with a banned list nudging the wrong side of the half-century mark.

The country’s inauspicious anti-doping record in all sports has led to similar questions surrounding next year’s Winter Olympics in Sochi and scepticism about the country’s credentials to host such renowned global events have been fuelled further by Vladimir Putin’s anti-gay legislation recently coming into force.

Even though Russia swept the medals at the World University Games and what was in effect a B-team retained their European Team Championships title in Gateshead, it hasn’t been a memorable year for Russian athletics – so far, at least. Their leading athletes have not performed with the same distinction and many have kept very low-profiles. It was largely thought they were being kept under lock-and-key with the purpose of keeping their powder dry for the main events.

However, one couldn’t help but notice an alarming drop in standards across the board to last year at the Russian Championships. Granted, one or two medal contenders were pre-selected but regardless, the difference in standard was eye-catching. Eleven sub-50.5 and five sub-50 400m performances were recorded last year while the winning time in the 400m this year was a comparatively modest 50.55. The whole championships just produced a solitary sub-2:00 800m compared to eight in 2012, and twelve in 2004, while the winning time in the 200m this year was slower than the eighth-placer’s from last year.

So, what can we conclude from these results? Perhaps the Russian coaches are peaking their athletes in time for the World Championships rather than their domestic championships, as has sometimes been the case? Russian athletes do have a propensity for running fast domestically before failing to produce the same calibre of performance at the major championships.

Or are the testers starting to catch up with arguably the world’s most notoriously consistent, and persistent offenders? The biological passport system has proved a particularly effective innovation in catching out cheats while lauded medal-winners such as Svetlana Krivelyova and Tatyana Kotova (pictured) have recently been brought under disrepute with retrospective testing of samples from previous championships.

The much-maligned Russian system has been placed firmly under the spotlight and has such pressure combined with the growing militancy of anti-doping procedures acted as the much-needed push to start the clean-up of the Russian system which has sadly clouded the reputation of their athletes? Or will normal service be resumed once the focus shifts away post-Moscow and post-Sochi?

Let’s hope it’s the former and we can enjoy a controversy-free World Championships next month.

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Olympic encore – London Anniversary Games preview (day one)

Twelve months after the Olympic Games, London will once again be at the epicentre of world athletics as a plethora of Olympic champions including Mo Farah, Usain Bolt and hopefully Jessica Ennis-Hill return to the setting of their gold medal triumphs. Drug scandals have dominated the back-pages but off-track controversies should be put to one side as capacity crowds are expected to rekindle the feel-good factor of the Olympic Games.

6.55pm – women’s pole-vault (DL)

Jenn Suhr returns to the scene of her Olympic triumph although the mantle of pre-competition favourite lies with Yarisley Silva from Cuba, who is the holder of the four best vaults outdoors this year including the world-lead of 4.90m. The silver medallist at the Olympics also has a 2-1 head-to-head record on Suhr this year including a win over her at the Sainsbury’s Grand Prix in Birmingham. Fabiana Murer from Brazil doesn’t have such good memories of this stadium as the world champion didn’t even get through qualifying last year but the 32-year-old is in good form with a 4.73m season’s best.

7pm – men’s discus (DL)

Piotr Malachowski’s form has waned since launching the seventh longest throw of all-time of 71.84m in June although the Pole did record his second best mark of the year of 68.53m in his penultimate competition to show he is coming back to form. Olympic champion Robert Harting, whose 35 competition win-streak was ended by Malachowski last month, is absent but the field still contains the two previous Olympic champions in Gerd Kanter and Virgilijus Alekna, who are both also ranked inside the all-time top-five. UK champion Brett Morse is ranked inside the world’s top-10 in 2013 with 66.84m and the world finalist will be looking for some scalps.

7.52pm – men’s 100m B

Moscow-bound Harry Aikines-Aryeetey leads the domestic cast although he could be called up to the ‘A’ race if someone pulls out. The runner-up at the UK Championships in a 10.08 PB is joined by third and fourth-placers Andrew Robertson and Mark Lewis-Francis, European under-23 champion Adam Gemili while 10.10 performer Joel Fearon will be hoping to make an impact after false-starting in the semi-finals at the UK Championships.

8.04pm – women’s 400m hurdles (DL)

This is shaping up to be the best race of the season in this event as the five fastest are set to race. Zuzana Hejnová from Czech Republic has dominated the commercial circuit with seven wins from seven races although the Olympic bronze medallist’s unblemished record might be put under some jeopardy as she faces Kori Carter for the first time. The newcomer won’t be going to the World Championships as she missed her trials semi-final with food poisoning but the 21-year-old won the much-coveted NCAA title in a world-leading 53.21 which is two-hundredths faster than Hejnová’s PB. Meanwhile, Perri Shakes-Drayton has been a perennial top-three fixture on the Diamond League circuit and the UK champion will be looking to give the Czech another close race.

8.09pm – men’s high jump (DL)

Bohdan Bondarenko is an unrecognisable athlete this year to the one who finished an anonymous eleventh at the European Championships and seventh in the Olympic final. The Ukrainian has won all but one competition this summer and his 2.41m clearance in Lausanne translated to the world’s best jump outdoors since 1994. The Olympic final which promised much last year was a disappointingly flat affair but this contest could be a classic as Bondarenko goes head-to-head with Mutaz Essa Barshim, who improved his Asian record to 2.40m in his last high-profile competition in Eugene. Olympic bronze medallist Robbie Grabarz and US champion Erik Kynard are also in the field.

8.15pm – women’s 3000m (DL)

Mercy Cherono comes fresh from winning the 5000m at the Kenyan Trials and she steps down to the distance where she’s twice won the world junior title. The American middle-distance fraternity will be keen to see how Jordan Hasay fares on her European debut while controversial Moscow omission Stephanie Twell will no doubt be hoping to prove the selectors wrong with a strong performance.

8.31pm – women’s triple jump (DL)

World University Games champion Yekaterina Koneva is expected to prosper with Diamond League leader Caterina Ibargüen from Colombia and world champion Olha Saladuha from Ukraine both absent.

8.36pm – women’s 1500m

Mary Cain was initially entered in the 800m but the US phenomenon could take a high-profile victory in her first race on the European circuit with Genzebe Dibaba, Abeba Aregawi and the leading Kenyans all absent.

8.46pm – men’s 200m (DL)

Warren Weir’s bronze medal last year came as something of a surprise but he’s proved that performance was no fluke with a mightily consistent season including victory at the Jamaican Championships in a 19.79 PB.

8.56pm – women’s 800m (DL)

In-form Brenda Martinez pushed her 1500m PB down to 4:00.94 in Monaco but she turns her attention back to the distance she’ll compete in at the World Championships. The runner-up at the US Championships will be confident of taking her first high-profile victory of the season with world-leader Francine Niyonsaba from Burundi a late scratch.

9.08pm – women’s 4x100m relay

This races provides an invaluable chance for nations to try out new combinations and to practice exchanges in a competitive environment before the World Championships. The much-chastised British sprint relay team have qualified for Moscow after missing out on an Olympic berth and a sharp showing will no doubt act as a confidence booster. The world-lead is held by a US team including Carmelita Jeter who produced a 41.75 clocking in Monaco.

9.21pm – men’s 400m (DL)

The gold and silver medallists from the Olympic Games reconvene a year later although the outcome shouldn’t be much different as Kirani James arrives with the two fastest times in the world to his name including a 43.96 world-lead which was only two-hundredths slower than his winning time at the Olympics. On the other hand, silver medallist Luguelin Santos, who started the season promisingly by running his fourth fastest time ever of 44.74 in April, hasn’t broke 45-second since. Moscow-bound Nigel Levine has already beaten leading Europeans Pavel Maslak and the Borlee brothers this year and he’ll be hoping to replicate this form on home-soil.

9.33pm – men’s 800m

American half-milers could take a clean sweep as the fastest in the field this year are US champion Duane Solomon (1:43.27), runner-up Nick Symmonds (1:43.70) and Brandon Johnson, who recently improved to 1:43.84 in Madrid.

9.48pm – men’s 100m

Sprinting is in desperate need of some good press in light of Asafa Powell and Tyson Gay’s positive drug tests so let’s hope Usain Bolt, who returns to the setting of his three gold medals from last summer, gets inspired to produce his best run of the season. The Jamaican, who has ‘only’ clocked 9.94 for the 100m this year, will be hoping to get out of the blocks better than he has done this year otherwise he could be vulnerable to his second defeat of 2013. James Dasaolu, who rocketed up the world-rankings and UK all-time lists with a 9.91 PB in the semi-finals at the UK Championships, won’t get many better chances to defeat the world record-holder and a straight final will help the cause of the oft-injured Brit, who was forced to sit out the final in Birmingham with cramp. Nesta Carter and a rejuvenated Kim Collins, who ran his first sub-10 clocking since 2003 in Lausanne, are also in the field.

As published in Athletics Weekly on July 25

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1500m PBs of the all-time top-30 5000m runners

1. Bekele – 3:32.35

2. Gebrselassie – 3:31.76

3. Komen – 3:29.46

4. Kipchoge – 3:33.20

5. Gebremeskel – no mark

6. Sihine – no mark

7. Gebrhiwet – no mark

8. Koech – 3:38.7hA

9. Songok – 3:30.99

10. Alamirew – 3:35.09+

11. Shaheen – 3:33.51

12. Longosiwa – 3:41.0A

13.Lahlafi – no mark

14. Kipkoech – no mark

15. Mourhit – 3:36.14

16. Tergat – no mark

17. El Guerrouj – 3:26.00

18. Goumri – 3:39.80

19. Masai – 3:37.3hA

20. Kipsiro – 3:37.6

21. Hissou – 3:33.95

22. Saidi-Sief – 3:29.51

23. Ebuya – 3:43.0hA

24. Chepkok – 3:40.47

25. Kipketer – 3:40.0hA

26. Soi – 3:44.76

27. T. Bekele – 3:37.26

28. Gebremariam – no mark

29. Chebii – 3:38.5hA

30. Farah – 3:33.98